ANATEL Lookup

Anatel is the Brazilian government organization for managing telecommunications and the wireless spectrum in Brazil. Wireless devices for sale in Brazil must be certified through Anatel before they are sold. The certification process documents several key items about a wireless device including user instructions, photos of the device,  frequency operating information, labeling documentation, and SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) information.

An ANATEL ID can be searched using the form below.

Anatel Search Approval Number (Homologado ou Certificado)

Cancellation, Rescheduling or Refusal of Programs

The FCC does not control the programming schedules of broadcast radio or television stations or the programming of subscription radio or television, such as cable, satellite radio, satellite television or video programming introduced by telephone companies. The FCC approves licenses for broadcast radio and television stations and regulates some aspects of their operations, but, under the Communications Act, it does not impose rules for selecting and scheduling programs.

Scheduling programs

Radio and television broadcasters and subscription service providers are expected to be aware of the problems and needs of the communities they serve and to present programs that address local issues. They are not required to air all programming that may be available to them from networks or other programming suppliers.

Complaints and concerns

All concerns or comments about radio or television programming selections should be directed to the broadcast or subscription service provider involved so that the people responsible for making the programming decisions can become better informed about audience opinion and reactions.

Contact the FCC

    • By phone: 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL Videophone: 1-844-432-2275
    • By mail:

Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

Accessible formats

To request this article in an accessible format – braille, large print, Word or text document or audio – write or call us at the address or phone number above, or send an email to [email protected].

Download a printable version of this guide

Call-In or Shock Jock Programs

Consumers often complain to the FCC about call-in radio programs. They most often object to the subject matter being discussed, or the accuracy or fairness of the commentary. Consumers also complain that their calls have been limited or barred by the station, or that program hosts are biased, insufficiently informed and/or discourteous. Many consumers also complain that the nature of the material being broadcast, like radio stunts or “shock jock” programs, is obscene, indecent, profane or otherwise offensive.

Broadcasters’ programming responsibilities

The FCC regulates the broadcast of obscene, indecent and profane programming. Neither the FCC nor any other government agency, however, can direct broadcasters to present or refrain from presenting specific programs, or tell them how to conduct their call-in shows and other programs, which might be regarded as censorship. Broadcasters are responsible for deciding what their stations present to the public.

Broadcasters are expected to be aware of the important local issues in the communities that their stations serve, and to offer programming that will inform their audiences about these issues. The selection of issues and the kinds of programming offered are the broadcasters’ responsibility. “Call-in” programs are not required to be used to discuss community issues.

Broadcasters are not obligated to give any particular individual an opportunity to participate in a broadcast unless the broadcast involves a candidate for public office. In general, broadcasters have wide discretion in choosing their programming.

Rules governing obscene, indecent and profane programming

Congress has given the FCC the responsibility for administratively enforcing the law that governs obscene, indecent and profane programming. The FCC may revoke a station license, impose a monetary forfeiture or issue an admonishment for the broadcast of obscene, indecent or profane material.

Obscene speech is not protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution and cannot be broadcast at any time. The Supreme Court has established that, to be considered obscene, material must meet a three-pronged test:

    • An average person, applying contemporary community standards, must find that the material, as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest.
    • The material must depict or describe, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by applicable law.
    • The material, taken as a whole, must lack serious literary, artistic, political or scientific value.

 

The FCC has defined broadcast indecency as “language or material that, in context, depicts or describes, in terms patently offensive as measured by contemporary community standards for the broadcast medium, sexual or excretory organs or activities.” Indecent programming contains patently offensive sexual or excretory material that does not rise to the level of obscenity. The courts hold that indecent material is protected by the First Amendment and cannot be banned entirely. FCC rules prohibit indecent speech on broadcast radio and television between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., when there is reasonable risk that children may be in the audience.

The FCC defines profane material as “including language so grossly offensive to members of the public who actually hear it as to amount to a nuisance.” Like indecency, profane speech is prohibited on broadcast radio and television between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

What if I have comments or concerns about a specific broadcast?

All comments and/or concerns about a specific broadcast should be directed, in writing, to the stations and networks involved so that the people responsible for making the programming decisions can become better informed about audience opinions.

What if I have a complaint about an obscene, indecent or profane program?

Enforcement actions in this area are based on documented complaints received from the public about specific obscene, indecent or profane material. The FCC analyzes what was actually aired, its meaning, and the context in which it was aired. Accordingly, we ask you to provide the following information:

    • Information regarding the details of what was actually said or depicted during the broadcast. Sufficient detail must be provided regarding the words or language used, or the images or scenes depicted during the broadcast, and the context of those words, language, images or scenes.
    • The date and time of the broadcast. Indecent or profane speech broadcast between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. is not actionable.
    • The call sign, channel, frequency and location of the station involved. The name of the program, DJ, on-air personality, song or network are also helpful.

 

This information will help us to quickly and efficiently process your complaint. The FCC does not require tapes or transcripts in support of complaints, but such materials may be helpful and should be provided if available. Any documentation you provide to the FCC about your complaint becomes part of the FCC’s records and may not be returned.

Filing a complaint

You have multiple options for filing a complaint with the FCC:

    • File a complaint online
    • By phone: 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL Videophone: 1-844-432-2275
    • By mail (please include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible):

Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

Accessible formats

To request this article in an accessible format – braille, large print, Word or text document or audio – write or call us at the address or phone number above, or send an email to [email protected].

Download a printable version of this guide

Take Action: Options for Filing an Accessibility Complaint

Congress passed the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) of 2010 “to help ensure that individuals with disabilities are able to fully utilize communications services and equipment and better access video programming.” To implement the CVAA, the FCC established new accessibility requirements for advanced communications and for Internet browsers built into mobile phones. The FCC also established new procedures for filing informal complaints about accessibility problems with the following:

    • Telephone services and equipment;
    • Advanced communications services and equipment; and
    • Internet browsers built into mobile phones.

 

Please select the action you want to take:

Contact the Company – Choose this option if you want to contact the company to try and resolve your accessibility problem. The FCC can help you find contact information for the company’s accessibility customer care representative.

Request Dispute Assistance – Choose this option if you want the FCC Disability Rights Office to assist you to resolve your accessibility problem. You will be directed to information about how to request assistance from the Disability Rights Office.

    • After you request assistance, the FCC Disability Rights Office will contact you to learn more about your accessibility problem.
    • The Disability Rights Office must work with you and the company for at least 30 days to try to resolve your accessibility problem, before you can file an informal complaint with the FCC Enforcement Bureau.
    • If your accessibility problem is not resolved in 30 days, you have two choices: (1) You may request an additional 30 days for assistance to try to resolve your problem, or (2) you may file an informal complaint with the FCC Enforcement Bureau.
    • You must request an additional 30 days for assistance or file an informal complaint within 60 days after the 30-day time period ends. If you take no action within 60 days, your accessibility case will be closed.

 

Extend the Time for Assistance – Choose this option if you want the Disability Rights Office to work with you and the company for an additional 30 days to resolve your accessibility problem. Only choose this option if you have already requested dispute assistance from the FCC Disability Rights Office and you want assistance for more than 30 days.

    • At the end of a 30-day extension, you must request an additional 30 days for assistance or file an informal complaint within 60 days. If you take no action within 60 days, your accessibility case will be closed.

 

File an Informal Complaint – Choose this option ONLY when:

    • You have previously filed a Request for Dispute Assistance with the FCC Disability Rights Office about the accessibility problem that is the subject of your informal complaint;
    • Thirty days have passed since you filed the Request for Dispute Assistance;
    • Any 30-day extension of time for assistance has expired;and
    • Your accessibility problem was not resolved.

 

    • You must file an informal complaint within 60 days after the first 30 days of assistance from the Disability Rights Office ends or after any 30-day extension of time ends. If you take no action within 60 days, your accessibility case will be closed.
    • More information is available in the following guide: File an Informal Accessibility Complaint.

 

If you need assistance, please contact the FCC Disability Rights Office at [email protected] or call 202-418-2517 (voice), 202-418-2922 (TTY) or 1-844-432-2275 (videophone).

 

Learn More About Filing an Informal Accessibility Complaint

Before you can file a Communications Accessibility Informal Complaint, you must request assistance from the FCC Disability Rights Office to resolve your accessibility problem. Details of the dispute assistance process and related information are available in the following guide: Take Action: Options for Filing an Accessibility Complaint.

 

When you file your complaint with the FCC Enforcement Bureau:

    • Assistance from the FCC Disability Rights Office to resolve your accessibility problem will end.
    • To request assistance from the FCC Disability Rights Office to resolve your accessibility problem, you must withdraw your complaint.
    • You may file your complaint again if your accessibility problem is not resolved.

 

Your Complaint

    • The FCC Enforcement Bureau will review your complaint.
    • If your complaint does not have the information needed to show a possible violation of the law, or is missing information necessary to complete your filing, the Enforcement Bureau will dismiss your complaint, but you will have an opportunity to file it again. If your complaint is dismissed, you may re-file your complaint adding information as necessary. You will be assigned a new complaint number when you re-file.
    • If your complaint is complete in all respects for filing, including having the information needed to show a possible violation of the law, the Enforcement Bureau will send your complaint to the company (or companies) that you identify in your complaint (called the “Defendant”).

 

Defendant’s Answer

    • The Defendant must answer your complaint within 20 days from the date it receives your complaint.
    • The Defendant will send you a copy of its answer or a summary of its answer.

 

Your Reply

 

Attn: CVAA, Telecommunications Consumers Division
Enforcement Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20554

    • Include your complaint number in the subject line of your e-mail, or at the top of your fax or letter. Failure to include your complaint number may result in your reply not being considered as the Enforcement Bureau reviews the case.
    • You must send a copy of your reply to the Defendant.

 

You and the Defendant May Resolve Your Complaint

 

Attn: CVAA, Telecommunications Consumers Division
Enforcement Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20554

    • Include your complaint number in the subject line of your e-mail, or at the top of your fax or letter.

 

The Enforcement Bureau Will Decide Your Complaint

    • The Enforcement Bureau will notify you and the Defendant about the Enforcement Bureau’s decision.

 

Information about requesting and filing a Communications Accessibility Informal Complaint form is available in the following guide: File an Informal Accessibility Complaint.

If you need assistance, please contact the FCC Disability Rights Office at [email protected] or call 202-418-2517 (voice), 202-418-2922 (TTY) or 1-844-432-2275 (videophone).

911 Wireless Services

The number of 911 calls placed by people using wireless phones has significantly increased in recent years. It is estimated that about 70 percent of 911 calls are placed from wireless phones, and that percentage is growing. For many Americans, the ability to call 911 for help in an emergency is one of the main reasons they own a wireless phone.

Unique challenges posed by wireless phones

While wireless phones can be an important public safety tool, they also create unique challenges for emergency response personnel and wireless service providers. Since wireless phones are mobile, they are not associated with one fixed location or address. While the location of the cell site closest to the 911 caller may provide a general indication of the caller’s location, that information is not always specific enough for rescue personnel to deliver assistance to the caller quickly.

Tips for 911 calling

Consumers making a 911 call from a wireless phone should remember the following:

    • Tell the emergency operator the location of the emergency right away.
    • Provide the emergency operator with your wireless phone number, so if the call gets disconnected, the emergency operator can call you back.
    • PSAPs currently lack the technical capability to receive texts, photos and videos.
    • If your wireless phone is not “initialized” (meaning you do not have a contract for service with a wireless service provider), and your emergency call gets disconnected, you must call the emergency operator back because the operator does not have your telephone number and cannot contact you.
    • To help public safety personnel allocate emergency resources, learn and use the designated number in your state for highway accidents or other non life-threatening incidents (States often reserve specific numbers for these types of incidents. For example, “#77” is the number used for highway accidents in Virginia.)
    • Refrain from programming your phone to automatically dial 911 when one button, such as the “9” key, is pressed. Unintentional wireless 911 calls, which often occur when auto-dial keys are inadvertently pressed, cause problems for emergency call centers.
    • If your wireless phone came pre-programmed with the auto-dial 911 feature already turned on, turn this feature off (consult your user manual for instructions).
    • Lock your keypad when you’re not using your wireless phone to help prevent accidental calls to 911.
    • Consider creating a contact in your wireless phone’s memory with the name “ICE” (In Case of Emergency), which lists the phone numbers of people you want to have notified in an emergency.

Ask about your handset’s E911 capabilities

When replacing your handset, ask about E911 capabilities. Some providers may offer incentives to encourage customers without location-capable phones to obtain new location-capable phones. Some providers may choose to prevent reactivation of older handsets that do not have E911 capability, or they may adopt various other measures. If a provider declines to reactivate a handset that is not location-capable, the FCC still requires the provider to deliver a 911 call from that handset to the appropriate PSAP.

Improving wireless 911 rules

The FCC has adopted rules aimed at improving the reliability of wireless 911 services and the accuracy of the location information transmitted with a wireless 911 call, as part of our efforts to improve public safety. The improvements help providing Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) with meaningful, accurate location information from wireless 911 callers in order to dispatch local emergency responders to the correct location and to provide assistance to 911 callers more quickly.

The FCC’s wireless 911 rules apply to all wireless licensees, broadband Personal Communications Service (PCS) licensees and certain Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) licensees. Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) providers, however, are currently excluded.

The FCC’s basic 911 rules require wireless service providers to transmit all 911 calls to a PSAP, regardless of whether the caller subscribes to the provider’s service or not.

Phase I Enhanced 911 (E911) rules require wireless service providers to provide the PSAP with the telephone number of the originator of a wireless 911 call and the location of the cell site or base station transmitting the call.

Phase II E911 rules require wireless service providers to provide more precise location information to PSAPs; specifically, the latitude and longitude of the caller. This information must be accurate to within 50 to 300 meters depending upon the type of location technology used.

The FCC recently required wireless carriers to provide more precise location information to PSAPs. As a result, wireless carriers will be required to comply with the FCC’s location accuracy rules at either a county-based or PSAP-based geographic level. The new standards apply to outdoor measurements only, as indoor use poses unique obstacles.

Compliance

Wireless service providers are required to file with the FCC a list of counties, or portions of counties, that they seek to exclude from the location accuracy requirements. The FCC permits exclusions only where wireless carriers determine that providing location accuracy is limited, or technologically impossible, because of either heavy forestation or the inability to triangulate a caller’s location. Wireless carriers must report any changes to their exclusion lists within 30 days of such changes. The exclusion lists and changes must be reported in the record of the FCC’s docketed proceeding addressing location accuracy, PS Docket No. 07-114, which is publicly available online.

Filing a complaint

You have multiple options for filing a complaint with the FCC:

    • File a complaint online
    • By phone: 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL Videophone: 1-844-432-2275
    • By mail (please include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible):

Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

Accessible formats

To request this article in an accessible format – braille, large print, Word or text document or audio – write or call us at the address or phone number above, or send an email to [email protected].

Download a printable version of this guide

Emergency Alert System

The Emergency Alert System is a national public warning system that requires TV and radio broadcasters, cable television systems, wireless cable systems, satellite digital audio radio service providers, direct broadcast satellite service providers and wireline video service providers to offer to the President the communications capability to address the American public during a national emergency. The system also may be used by state and local authorities to deliver important emergency information such as AMBER (missing children) alerts and emergency weather information targeted to a specific area.

How does the EAS work?

The FCC works with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Serviceto implement the EAS at the national level. Only the President determines when the EAS will be activated at the national level, and has delegated the administration of this function to FEMA. Accordingly, FEMA activates the national EAS, and directs national EAS tests and exercises. The NWS uses the EAS on a local and statewide basis to provide the public with alerts and warnings regarding dangerous weather and other emergency conditions.

The EAS allows participating providers to send and receive emergency information quickly and automatically, even if their facilities are unattended. If one link in the system for spreading emergency alert information is broken, members of the public have multiple alternate sources of warning. EAS equipment also provides a method for automatic interruption of regular programming, and in certain instances is able to relay emergency messages in languages other than English.

What is the FCC’s role in EAS?

The FCC’s role includes prescribing rules establishing technical standards for the EAS, procedures for EAS participants to follow in the event the EAS is activated and EAS testing protocols. Additionally, the FCC ensures that state and local EAS plans developed by industry conform to the FCC’s EAS rules and regulations. The FCC’s goal is to make the EAS capable of distributing emergency information as quickly as possible to as many people as possible.

How can state and local authorities use EAS?

Along with its capability of providing an emergency message to the entire nation simultaneously, the EAS allows authorized state and local authorities to quickly distribute important local emergency information. A state emergency manager can use the EAS to broadcast a warning from one or more major radio stations in a particular state. EAS equipment in other radio and television stations, as well as in cable television systems in that state, can automatically monitor and rebroadcast the warning.

What about weather emergencies?

Additionally, EAS equipment can directly monitor the NWS for local weather and other emergency alerts, which local broadcast stations, cable systems, and other EAS participants can then rebroadcast, providing an almost immediate relay of local emergency messages to the public.

Filing a complaint

You have multiple options for filing a complaint with the FCC:

    • File a complaint online
    • By phone: 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL Videophone: 1-844-432-2275
    • By mail (please include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible):

Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

Accessible formats

To request this article in an accessible format – braille, large print, Word or text document or audio – write or call us at the address or phone number above, or send an email to [email protected].

Download a printable version of this guide

Hearing Aid Compatibility for Wireless Telephones

The Hearing Aid Compatibility Act requires the FCC to ensure all wireline telephones manufactured or imported for use in the United States and all “essential” telephones, such as public phones, emergency phones and workplace phones are hearing aid-compatible. Beginning in 2003, the FCC established rules for the hearing aid compatibility of digital wireless phones as well.

What makes a telephone hearing aid compatible?

Hearing aid compatible phones have an internal feature that works with telecoil or T-coil hearing aids.

In the United States, about 60 percent of hearing aids contain telecoils, which generally are used by individuals with profound hearing loss.

Many people report feedback or “squealing” when they place the handset of the telephone next to their hearing aid. T-coil hearing aids can eliminate this feedback because their microphones automatically turn off to block out ambient sound and the hearing aids only amplify the phone signal.

Consumer tip: Some hearing-aid users may need to place the ear-piece slightly behind the ear rather than directly over the ear to obtain the clearest signal.

What additional technology considerations are there for wireless phones?

The ability to make wireless telephones compatible with hearing aids also depends in part on other technical and design choices made by carriers and manufacturers. For example, for technical reasons, it is easier to meet hearing aid compatibility standards on systems using Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) air interface than on systems using Global System for Mobile (GSM). It is also easier to meet hearing aid compatibility standards in phones with flip phone designs than in other styles.

What are the requirements for hearing aid compatibility for digital wireless telephones?

Analog wireless telephones usually do not cause interference with hearing aids. Digital wireless telephones, on the other hand, sometimes cause interference because of electromagnetic energy emitted by the telephone’s antenna, backlight or other components.

The standard for compatibility of digital wireless phones with hearing aids is American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard C63.19. A digital wireless handset is considered hearing aid-compatible if it meets a “T3” (or “U3T”) rating under the ANSI standard.

In addition to rating wireless phones, the ANSI standard also provides a methodology for rating hearing aids from M1 to M4, with M1 being the least immune to RF interference and M4 the most immune. To determine whether a particular digital wireless telephone is likely to interfere with a particular hearing aid, the immunity rating of the hearing aid is added to the rating of the telephone. A sum of four indicates the telephone is usable, five indicates normal use and six or greater indicates the telephone would provide excellent performance for hearing aid users.

Are there labeling and testing requirements?

Packages containing hearing aid-compatible handsets must be explicitly labeled and must include detailed information in the package or product manual.

Wireless service providers must offer a means for consumers to test hearing aid-compatible handsets in their retail stores.

Some hearing aid manufacturers are voluntarily including information about hearing aid compatibility with their products.

Manufacturers and service providers are required to post information about their hearing aid-compatible handset offerings on their websites.

Some handsets are capable of using wireless technologies, such as Wi-Fi, for which hearing aid compatibility technical standards have not yet been adopted by the FCC. If a handset includes such a technology, the packaging material and other disclosures must inform consumers that such operations have not been tested for use with hearing aids.

Try before you buy

Be sure to try your wireless device with your hearing aid in the store before making your purchase. It’s best to try several models before buying to find the best match with your hearing aids. Visit a full service carrier store and ask to try devices that have been designated as “hearing aid compatible.” Your cell phone’s RF emissions can change depending on your location. Be sure to fully evaluate your listening experience outside and during the return period.

Filing a complaint

If you have a problem using a hearing aid with a digital wireless phone that is labeled as hearing aid-compatible, first try to resolve it with the equipment manufacturer or your wireless service provider. If you can’t resolve the issue directly, you have multiple options for filing a complaint with the FCC:

  • File a complaint online
  • By phone: 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL Videophone: 1-844-432-2275
  • By mail (please include your name, address, contact information and as much detail about your complaint as possible):

Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

What to include in your complaint

Your complaint should include:

  • The make and model number of the equipment or device you are complaining about
  • The name, address, and telephone number (if known) of the company or companies involved in your complaint
  • A brief description of your complaint and the resolution you are seeking, and a full description of the equipment or service you are complaining about, including date of purchase, use or attempt to use

For more information

For more information about FCC programs to promote access to telecommunications services for people with disabilities, visit the FCC’s Disability Rights Office website.

A list of all equipment manufactures and service providers.

Accessible formats

To request this article in an accessible format – braille, large print, Word or text document or audio – write or call us at the address or phone number above, or send an email to [email protected].

FCC Consumer Complaints by Service Type

The following charts and downloadable spreadsheets detail complaint-filing activity for the Consumer Help Center since its launch on Dec. 29, 2014 unless otherwise noted. Overview charts and data for the Help Center are available here. Charts and data by service type are available here.

This data represents information selected by the consumer. The FCC does not verify all of the facts alleged in these complaints

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Hc2wF0akPP4eWL1oo5Yv2fXaKeEdaHfFdIV1gMrLR04/pubchart?oid=1975392869&format=interactive

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1go7oX8tuUBiWrsch7_Xv629deXh27zcDfBhM0fI_MlQ/pubchart?oid=1099339137&format=interactive

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/11rTJT5C3Fk__2c665Un4iLIssAyis165LRR-opG3s1g/pubchart?oid=295674498&format=interactive

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/15YXvuhkye_QF_MfD6z3vbD6zUWCI1Td_fXTf07YVX5I/pubchart?oid=12008444&format=interactive

FCC Consumer Complaints by U.S. State

The following maps and downloadable spreadsheet detail complaint-filing activity by U.S. state and territories since the launch of the Consumer Help Center on Dec. 29, 2014. Move your cursor over the maps for consumer complaints data by state or download state data by selecting the download link below.

This data represents information selected by the consumer. The FCC does not verify all of the facts alleged in these complaints

Total Complaints Filed by U.S. State

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VJ24nF8Ke0N2N7n2Oj6JOtrXFuNuvBrGB2SXOjD2vuQ/pubchart?oid=546838140&format=interactive

Complaints Filed Per Capita by U.S. State

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1mFMFMNsB_llKaygXdt_qLBd1lnr2G951rpC4v1QLmkI/pubchart?oid=1856912979&format=interactive