What is the IC ID “IC” on a cell phone?

An IC ID (sometimes abbreviated IC) on a cell phone is the regulatory certification number used to certify the cell phone complies to wireless emissions standards in Canada. Using the IC ID, you can lookup the wireless frequency the cell phone uses, the radiation you may be absorbing by using the cell phone, and other technical information about the device. IC IDs must be on all cell phones and other wireless transmitting devices certifying they are approved for use in Canada. The USA has a similar approval process which involves FCC IDs. Effectively, this makes the IC ID / IC the Canadian equivalent to the FCC ID.

South Korea has an equivalent process assigning KCC ID / MSIP.
China has an equivalent process assigning the CMIIT ID.

Where to find an FCC ID?

FCC IDs are typically printed on the label of a device. In 2014, the FCC introduced the eLabel act, allowing manufacturers to include the FCC ID in the user manual of the device as well as electronically labeling the device in the settings menu. You may be able to locate your device’s FCC ID in the device information section of the settings menu. Another good place to check is under the battery or in the battery compartment of the device. If you can’t find the fcc id, these methods will help you locate your FCC ID on your phone or other devices.

Finding the FCC ID

  1. Dial *#07# to bring up the device information.
    • Calling this number will not charge you anything or use any minutes
  2. Check your device settings. You may be able to find the FCC ID under the Legal & Regulatory information on your device
    • Settings > About > Legal Information > Regulatory
  3. Search your device model in Google using the keyword site:fccid.io
    • include your model number

where to find fcc id number on car
where is the fcc id located
where to find fcc id number

Sony NW-A35 / NW-WM1A / NW-WM1Z Digital Music Players

Sony is creating several variations of “Digital Music Players” model numbers NW-A35 / NW-A30 / NW-WM1Z. All these devices are approved to operate at WiFi and RFID frequencies, but further information on the devices has been made confidential.

Sony NW-A35 Rear
Sony NW-A35 Rear

The end of confidentiality for many of these documents is 2016-09-02, indicating a possible release date before then.

FCC ID AK8NWWM1A
FCC ID AK8NWWM1Z
FCC ID AK8NWA30

Sony NW-WM1A

FCC ID QMP505NR2

The VisionNet ADSL2+ 4 Port Wireless Modem with USB
Model Number M505N Rev2
FCC ID QMP505NR2
is missing FCC Registration. Here is the label from one of the models.

VisionNet ADSL M505N
VisionNet ADSL M505N

IP 192.168.1.1 OR 192.168.254.1
Login: enduser
Password: password

Interestingly, this may just be a typo on the label as it seems to be missing the complete model number QMP[M]505NR2

What is FCC ID for car remote?

An FCC ID on a car remote or wireless key fob is the regulatory certification number used to certify the fob (remote) complies to wireless emissions standards. Using the FCC ID, you can lookup the wireless frequency the car remote uses, the radiation you may be absorbing when pressing buttons on the remote, and other technical information about the device. FCC IDs must be on all car remotes and other wireless transmitting devices certifying they are approved for use in the USA. Television remotes do not need FCC IDs because they use infrared light to communicate with the TV instead of the wireless spectrum.

FCC ID versus IC ID

FCC ID is the United State’s Federal Communication Commission’s identifier for authorizing wireless devices for sale within the USA. Like the FCC ID, Canada has an IC ID registration system for wireless equipment licensed for sale and operation in Canada. This system is often referred to as the Radio Equipment List or REL. Canada’s REL has similar requirements of radio lab testing and emissions/spectrum limitations before a new IC ID is issued and the radio equipment authorized.

Similar to FCC IDs, IC IDs have begin with a business registration number (XXXXX) and end with a serial number or model number for the device (YYYYYY). They are typically found in the format XXXXXX-YYYYY where X and Y can be numbers or letters (upper case).
As an example, Honeywell has a registration code of 1693B. All registered honeywell products begin with 1693B followed by a dash “-” and then the chosen license id of the product. Registration numbers are always numbers and letters, typically 5 characters in length. Some of the older (pre-2000) issued radio equipment can have differing identifiers.

FCC Equipment Authorization Procedure

A Part 15 transmitter must be tested and authorized before it may be marketed. There
are two ways to obtain authorization: certification and verification.
See Section 15.201, Section 2.803, 47 U.S.C. 302(b)

Certification
The certification procedure requires that tests be performed to measure the levels of radio frequency energy that are radiated by the device into the open air or conducted by the device onto the power lines. A description of the measurement facilities of the laboratory where these tests are performed must be on file with the Commission’s laboratory or must accompany the certification application. After these tests have been performed, a report must be produced showing the test procedure, the test results, and some additional information about the device including design drawings. The specific information that must be included in a certification report is detailed in Part 2 of the FCC Rules.
See Section 2.948, 2.1033, 2.938, 2.1033

Certified transmitters also are required to have two labels attached: an FCC ID label and a compliance label. The FCC ID label identifies the FCC equipment authorization file that is associated with the transmitter, and serves as an indication to consumers that the transmitter has been authorized by the FCC. The compliance label indicates to consumers that the transmitter was authorized under Part 15 of the FCC rules and that it may not cause, nor is it protected from, harmful interference.

The FCC ID.

The FCC ID must be permanently marked (etched, engraved, indelibly printed, etc.) either directly on the transmitter, or on a tag that is permanently affixed (riveted, welded, glued, etc.) to it. The FCC ID label must be readily visible to the purchaser at the time of purchase.
Section 2.925

The FCC ID is a string of 4 to 17 characters. It may contain any combination of capital letters, numbers, or the dash/hyphen character. Characters 4 through 17 may be designated, as desired, by the applicant. The first three characters, however, are the “grantee code,” a code assigned by the FCC to each particular applicant (grantee). Any application filed with the FCC must have an FCC ID that begins with an assigned grantee code.
Section 2.925, 2.926

The Grantee Code. To obtain a code, new applicants must send in a letter stating the applicant’s name and address and requesting a grantee code. This letter must be accompanied by a completed “Fee Advice Form” (FCC Form 159), and a $45 processing fee. See Obtaining…filing packets on page 31.
Section 1.1103

The Compliance Label. The applicant for a grant of certification is responsible for having the compliance label produced and for having it affixed to each device that is marketed or imported. The wording for the compliance label is in Part 15, and may be included on the same label as the FCC ID, if desired.
Section 15.19

The compliance label and FCC ID label may not be attached to any devices until a grant of certification has been obtained for the devices.
Section 2.926

Once the report demonstrating compliance with the technical standards has been completed, and the compliance label and FCC ID label have been designed, the party wishing to get the transmitter certified (it can be anyone) must file a copy of the report, an “Application for Equipment Authorization” (FCC Form 731) and an $845 application fee, with the FCC. See Obtaining…filing packets on page 31.
Section 2.911, 2.1033, 1.1103

After the application is submitted, the FCC’s lab will review the report and may or may not request a sample of the transmitter to test. If the application is complete and accurate, and any tests performed by the FCC’s lab confirm that the transmitter is compliant, the FCC will then issue a grant of certification for the transmitter. Marketing of the transmitter may begin after the applicant has received a copy of this grant.
Section 2.943, 2.803

Typically, 90% of the applications for certification that the FCC receives are processed within 30 calendar days. This time frame may increase due to incomplete applications and pre-grant sampling, if determined to be necessary.
Section 2.943

Verification

The verification procedure requires that tests be performed on the transmitter to be authorized using a laboratory that has calibrated its test site or, if the transmitter is incapable of being tested at a laboratory, at the installation site. These tests measure the levels of radio frequency energy that are radiated by the transmitter into the open air or conducted by the transmitter onto the power lines. After these tests are performed, a report must be produced showing the test procedure, the test results, and some additional information about the transmitter including design drawings. The specific information that must be included in a verification report is detailed in Part 2 of the FCC Rules.
Sections 2.951 through 2.957

Once the report is completed, the manufacturer (or importer for an imported device) is required to keep a copy of it on file as evidence that the transmitter meets the technical standards in Part 15. The manufacturer (importer) must be able to produce this report on short notice should the FCC ever request it.
Section 2.955 Section 2.956

The Compliance Label.
The manufacturer (or importer) is responsible for having the compliance label produced, and for having it affixed to each transmitter that is marketed or imported. The wording for the compliance label is included in Part 15. Verified transmitters must be uniquely identified with a brand name and/or model number that cannot be confused with other, electrically different transmitters on the market. However, they may not be labelled with an FCC ID or in a manner that could be confused with an FCC ID.
Section 15.19 Section 2.954

Once the report showing compliance is in the manufacturer’s (or importer’s) files and the compliance label has been attached to the transmitter, marketing of the transmitter may begin. There is no filing with the FCC required for verified equipment.
Section 2.805

Any equipment that connects to the public switched telephone network, such as a cordless telephone, is also subject to regulations in Part 68 of the FCC Rules and must be registered by the FCC prior to marketing. The rules in Part 68 are designed to protect against harm to the telephone network.
Section 68.102

Authorization Procedures for Part 15 Transmitters
Authorization Procedures for Part 15 Transmitters

FCC Verification and Certification Procedures
FCC Verification and Certification Procedures

Certification: Sections 2.1031 through 2.1045
Verification: Sections 2.951 through 2.957

Full Text: https://fccid.io/bulletin-oet63rev.pdf